Category Archives: Executive Functioning

Neurodiversity, or “The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism” -Proposing the “Medi-Social© Model of Disability and Neurodivergence” III-

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One of writing’s most complex hurdles is leaving one’s “body” to immerse in the dream within dream of creating a structure for a world somewhat different than the original.

In the dystopian nightmare created by Orwell, Emmanuel Goldstein’s “book” becomes the embodiment of Winston’s hope that his participatory complicity in changing the past to suit a power-dependent, fluid future, will be forgiven, first of all by his own, desperate, depleted, sick, hungry and frightened self…

History has proven over and over again, that “Ignorance is Strength”; that the more “society” needs to ascend to a higher level of “consciousness” the easiest way is through what has become known as “purges”, or the “natural selection through the survival of the fittest”. This is what binds together Thomas Malthus’ theory of passive purge of the weak and vulnerable and Mao Zedong, architect of the murderous “cultural revolution” purge. The “fittest” will decide the means through which the less fortunate may be left, or helped to remain silent…

For some time now, the cult like “neurodiversity movement” has been going through a desperate process of finding any meaning in Singer’s frankensteinian, biodiversity inspired monstrosity. Waves upon waves of more or less well-meaning scientists of mostly non-medical sciences, ridden by more or less derailed individuals and their cohorts, are competing in a sinister race to purge a past they neither understand, nor desire to understand, from anything standing in their way to re-build something for which they have no plans whatsoever…

For some yet cloud shrouded reason, the #NDcult has chosen Autism as their main re-constructionist experiment, probably for the simple, utilitarian reason of being a still unknown disorder, having nevertheless the attention of a spotlight large enough to illuminate their narcissistic egos. And to ensure that ignorance is being further strengthened, they have ever since remembered to pay lip service to other dyslexia, dyspraxia and neurodivergent disorders, relabeling them as evolutionary achievements, “simple variations” of our brains.

As for the “what shall we do with the severe autism part”, the #NDcult has re-branded everything and anything ill-fitting their “geek syndrome”, as comorbidities to be dealt with by the medical professionals ostracised by neurodiversity sociology’s relentless “de-medicalising” and “de-pathologising” purges. Parents and carers of non-geek Autistic individuals have also been targeted for every politically incorrect attempt to express their frustration, pain and desire for finding scientifically valid treatments for their loved ones, being trampled in the mud of the vilest sub-human abuse.

In a recent tweet, @stevesilberman made valiant proof of why neither investigative journalism, nor a career in law should lead the way in shaping the future for millions of people with Autism worldwide. Because if he really meant writing, that “This whole thing is one of the most powerful statements of what ‘neurodiversity’ really means” as an introduction to Tay­lor-Park­er’s following idea, neither of them has any idea of what an IQ 30 means:

“Neu­ro­di­ver­si­ty isn’t an idea whose use­ful­ness is lim­it­ed to peo­ple who are “high func­tion­ing” or “just quirky” because it inher­ent­ly looks at peo­ple who will have exten­sive, expen­sive sup­port needs for the fore­see­able future and asks how we can help these peo­ple build the best pos­si­ble lives for them­selves. Neu­ro­di­ver­si­ty looks to every idea, tool, and prac­ti­cal solu­tion it can lay hands on to answer the ques­tion of how to have a good life with an IQ of 30, exec­u­tive func­tion­ing dif­fi­cul­ties, schiz­o­phre­nia, no ver­bal speech, or all of the above. Where med­i­cine is stumped, and the peo­ple affect­ed may not even want a “cure,” neu­ro­di­ver­si­ty draws heav­i­ly on the social mod­el of dis­abil­i­ty to offer some­thing unique: hope”.

To clarify what an IQ 30 really means, allow me to use as an example the details provided in the former DSM 4 TR:

“318.1 Severe Mental Retardation: IQ level 20-25 to 35-40 (accounts for 3-4% of retarded population). The group with Severe Mental Retardation constitutes 3%-4%of individuals with Mental Retardation. During the early childhood years, they acquire little or no communication speech. During the school-age period, they may learn to talk and can be trained in elementary self-care skills. They profit to only a limited extent from instruction in pre-academic subjects, such as familiarity with the alphabet and simple counting, but can master skills such as learning slight reading of some “survival” words. In their adult years, they may be able to perform simple tasks in closely supervised settings. Most adapt well to life in the community, in group homes or with their families, unless they have an associated handicap that requires specialized nursing or other care. (emphasis mine.)

May I ask anyone for that matter, which part of this DSM quote would offer any incentive for someone to believe that individuals living on this severe end of the Autism Spectrum, could ever “build the best pos­si­ble lives for them­selves”? Because “closely supervised settings” have little do with either autonomy or independence! And why would anyone want a severely disabled, highly dependent individual to build such lives for themselves, when the first call should be the warmth and dedication of their own families to help and assist them, except for when that would be practically impossible? Unfortunately, submitting the article to a simple search for words such as “family/families” returned a disappointing “no results”. However, reading the article I was shocked to find the opposite of what a family should stand for, which is “filicide”, “the deliberate act of a parent killing their own child” …

I am not going to apologise for asking, but what sort of mentality would drive anyone to write an entire article where the only reference to family is a concept on the criminal opposite of what a family should be?

Indeed, as suspected in the beginning, the strength of “neurodiversity” as a “movement”, seems to be its obnoxious ignorance summarised in: “accept the fact that med­i­cine doesn’t have an answer to neu­ro­log­i­cal vari­ety” and most important, “accept­ing that peo­ple are peo­ple, and, love it, hate it, or feel ambiva­lent about it, there is no cure today.”

Is this the “future” of “gold” so fiercely advocated by neurodiversity, the fatalistic view that if “there is no cure today” there won’t be one tomorrow? Is this the reason why neurodiversity is so hell-bent in “de-medicalising” and “de-pathologising” autism, campaigning against vital, life saving medical research about the complex neuro-physiopathology of Autism and its comorbidities, so brazenly called “quackery” by some neurodiversity proponents?

Let me ask in a non-delegated, but implicated way, what shall we do, all clinical professionals from countless fields of medical, health and care sciences? Throw away our passion for being better providers, to the best of our capabilities, of anything and everything could make the lives of people with autism, dyslexia, dyspraxia, Tourette’s, epilepsy, seizures and many other aspects of probably the same, most complex neurodevelopmental disorder, and embrace “neurodiversity” with its utter misunderstanding of the social model of disability? As I have said many times, myself and all clinical professionals I know, work closely together with our dedicated social work colleagues, in multi-disciplinary teams sometimes desperately trying to ensure equitable opportunities to everyone in our care. And we are far from perfect, but I have never heard any of my clinical colleagues talking about “de-socialising” our teams, or our social work colleagues about “de-clinicalising” them?

No, not by any chance…

Returning to my title, I must reiterate my surprise to have realised that the neurodiversity movement is indeed collectivism, with a structure of unquestionable allegiance to its oligarchically maintained “ideology”, which in their own words rests on two major principles. The 1st principle is “Every­one gets the same basic rights”, the 2nd being “There are no excep­tions for label, IQ, or degree of sup­port needs”. By the way, please don’t approach me with diversions such us “why haven’t I read everything in context”! I did, again and again, just to have become unwilling to suffer any longer the inflicted intellectual distress…

I will conclude with another statement which seems to be the essence of what neurodiversity is, and its effects on a society maybe expecting more help instead of even more suffering:

“Neu­ro­di­ver­si­ty is an idea for strong peo­ple, as it bites and claws at every­one who embraces it.”

And I can confirm with my own life and experience, that “neurodiversity” and its cult-like movement has left me with nothing but bite-marks and claw-scars since the day I “embraced” it.

Because if one’s strength is their ignorance, their peace will be a war against themselves and ultimately others.

Remember nevertheless, that ultimately, the real victims of all wars are not the strong, but the vulnerable…

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The Cognitive-Behavioural Interpretative Isolationism of Intellectually Proficient Kanner’s & Asperger’s Autism (IPKAA)© Part 2 – Arbitrarily Set Standards of Executive Functioning

Part 2 – Arbitrarily Set Standards of Executive Functioning

By Rom Feldmann© FdScMH, LTh(Hons), CertEd,

PgCert Special Psychopedagogy,

PgCert Autism & Asperger’s, QTS

 

– The Theory of Executive Dysfunction

            ‘Executive function is an umbrella term for functions such as planning,       working memory, impulse control, inhibition, and shifting set, as well   as for the initiation and monitoring of action.’ (Hill, 2004, 1)

Hill states that in order to guide actions, these functions need to disengage from the immediate environment, which seems to suggest that at least part of an Executive Dysfunctionality has to present as an impairment of an autistic’s ability to disengage from the object/subject of their immediate environment’s single focus and shifting their attention to possible prompts by external stimuli.

However, I would question the axiomatic assumption that an apparent non-responsiveness to external focus-shifting prompts must be seen as an ‘impairment’, since such an assumption would imply a standard, focus-shifting expectation to all incoming external stimuli, mandatory for all, as a pre-requisite of a social interaction expectation singularity, a universal norm.

Judging such a perceived non-responsiveness as some pathologically uncontrollable ‘aloofness’ is a dangerous, a priori inconsideration of an autistic’s right to wilfully accept or reject incoming stimuli, regardless of their animate or inanimate origins. Autistics, as anyone else, have the fundamental right of deciding without any obligation to justify their choice, to accept or reject anyone’s, verbal or otherwise, approach.

Given the fact that most “Intellectually Proficient Autistics©” have an upper-level thought process best to be characterised as an intense continuum, would render approaches as unsolicited intrusiveness, met with and honest and non-dissimulated  disinterest or silent/verbal rejections. Justifiably, disrespectful insistence is oftentimes perceived as aggression, which could lead to provoked shut- or meltdowns. It is unfortunate that these provoked episodes with extremely distressful consequences are not considered or classified as physical and/or emotional abuse or in many cases, assault.

The other aspect of this theory (Frith et al, 2010, p15 footnote) is an analogy with neuropsychological patients displaying impaired executive functions caused by frontal lobes damage, suggested by similar ‘frontal test’ results produced by these subjects and individuals diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome and high-functioning autism.

Again, validating such a theory ignores an autistic’s volitional selectivity, leaving us either presumably brain damaged, or without any control over some pathological compulsions.

The question however, the genuinely disturbing question is: who decided  what the ‘standards’ of executive functionality are, and why divergence from these ‘standards’ must be viewed as “impairment” or “pathology”?

A possible answer is as disturbing as the question: the decision was most probably taken by neurotypical gatekeepers, interested (consciously or not) in establishing, further maintaining easily controllable, rigidly normative societal structures, leaving most population subject to a mass Stockholm Syndrome, using arbitrarily imposed societal ‘norms’ as means of compliance control, rewarded with nothing else than randomly refrained law enforcement harassment, disguised as ‘protection under the rule of law’.

Pathologising on grounds of superficial behavioural observations and biased evaluation premises, “Intellectually Proficient Autism & Asperger’s©” (IPAA©) individuals, is nothing more than attempts to control the innate proneness to logical judgement and justice, oftentimes displayed by IPAAs deeply involved and attached to protecting the vulnerable, fact also clearly backed by Tony Atwood  (Wylie et al, 2016, pg. 12)…

Pathologising our dedication to equality is a sad and dangerous attempt to devaluate justice into a law enforced pragmatic utilitarianism, reminiscent of malthusianism…

(to be continued…)

 

-Frith, U. (Ed.), Asperger, H., Wing, L., Gillberg, C., Tantam, D., Dewey, M., Happé, F. G. E., (2010). Autism and Asperger Syndrome. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

-Hill, E. L. (rev. 2004). Evaluating the theory of executive dysfunction in autism.  http://research.gold.ac.uk/2560/1/hill_devrev04_GRO.pdf accessed 10.01.2018

-Hill, E. L. (2004). Executive dysfunction in autism. TRENDS in Cognitive Sciences Vol.8 No.1, January 2004, 26 http://www.ucd.ie/artspgs/langimp/autismexecdysf.pdf accessed 10.01.2018

-Wylie, P., Lawson, W. B., Beardon, L., (2016). The Nine Degrees of Autism, A Developmental Model for the Alignment and Reconciliation of Hidden Neurological Conditions. Hove and New York: Routledge

Tenth of Asperger’s Ten Traits – Functioning nearly executes us…

Exec Func 2

“10) We have difficulty with executive functioning. The way we process the world is different. Tasks that others take for granted, can cause us extreme hardship. Learning to drive a car, to tuck in the sheets of a bed, to even round the corner of a hallway, can be troublesome. Our spatial awareness and depth-awareness seems off. Some will never drive on a freeway, never parallel park, and/or never drive. Others will panic following directions while driving. New places offer their own set of challenges. Elevators, turning on and off faucets, unlocking doors, finding our car in a parking lot, (even our keys in our purse), and managing computers, electronic devices, or anything that requires a reasonable amount of steps, dexterity, or know-how can rouse in us a sense of panic. While we might be grand organizers, as organizing brings us a sense of comfort, the thought of repairing, fixing, or locating something causes distress. Doing the bills, cleaning the house, sorting through school papers, scheduling appointments, keeping track of times on the calendar, and preparing for a party can cause anxiety. Tasks may be avoided. Cleaning may seem insurmountable. Where to begin? How long should I do something? Is this the right way? Are all questions that might come to mind. Sometimes we step outside of ourselves and imagine a stranger entering our home, and question what they would do if they were in our shoes. We reach out to others’ rules of what is right, even in isolation, even to do the simplest of things. Sometimes we reorganize in an attempt to make things right or to make things easier. Only life doesn’t seem to get easier. Some of us are affected in the way we calculate numbers or in reading. We may have dyslexia or other learning disabilities. We may solve problems and sort out situations much differently than most others. We like to categorize in our mind and find patterns, and when ideas don’t fit, we don’t know where to put them. Putting on shoes, zipping or buttoning clothes, carrying or packing groceries, all of these actions can pose trouble. We might leave the house with mismatched socks, our shirt buttoned incorrectly, and our sweater inside out. We find the simple act of going grocery shopping hard: getting dressed, making a list, leaving the house, driving to the store, and choosing objects on the shelves is overwhelming.”

Used with permission from @everydayaspergers. Originally published in Samantha Croft‘s -now former- blog, Everyday Asperger’s, as The Ten Traits.

Again, adding anything to Sam Croft’s brilliant detailing of the incredible stress caused to individuals with (HF)Autism and Asperger’s by what “others take for granted”, is hardly possible.

Being blessed/cursed with an intellect way beyond average and having stopped apologising about it especially to neurotypicals who think that being smart means wearing certain (otherwise stupidly uncomfortable) clothes, I decided to use my neurobiological compulsion for honesty, for openly appreciating or criticising what’s worth my time and effort…

Well, in Samantha Croft’s case, I hope to have repeatedly made myself loudly clear about how pleased I am to take a bow as many times I read The Ten Traits, considering it a proper diamond in the hard nutshell of understanding the unique individuality of Asperger’s, wholeheartedly recommending it to anyone having started to understand first of all their own, or their loved ones’ neurodivergence.

What’s left for me to write? Some of my own experience, following Sam’s lead.

-“to […] round the corner of a hallway” – Blessed art thou, who don’t need to go around the corner of a simple hallway, firstly by significantly slowing down your pace, secondly by following your path by nearly rubbing your shoulder against the wall opposite that corner, and thirdly even so, managing sometimes to bruise your corner’s side shoulder against it. And if there’s no corner, there will be an open door, the same armchair, coffee table, anything which should be somewhere else… And if there’s nothing in your way, your brain will desperately attempt to find a pattern-like structure to align itself by, in which case everything returns to square one…

-“Some will […] never parallel park” – So here’s my problem: every time I attempt to park my car between other cars, my brain gets short-circuited between using as a reference my door’s inferior window frame, the cars on each side, the cars in front/behind me, continuously disturbed by the crisscrossing pedestrians, the very annoying  but vital noise of my car’s parking sensors, and on top of all my occasional, all-knowing passenger who genuinely wants to help, and for whom I’m thinking of installing a badly needed “eject seat” button…

-“We may have Dyslexia…” – and also Dyspraxia, and Dyscalculia, and Irlen Syndrome, but that doesn’t seem to exclude mastering several languages, several degrees, several musical instruments.

Is there anything else left to say?

Yes:

Aspergers and Ignorance (2)